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Elephant Rose by Jean-Baptiste Courtier

If someone tells you not to think of a pink elephant, you immediately see a pink elephant in your mind’s eye, right? Photographer Jean-Baptiste Courtier took this little perceptional trick to create his series ‘Elephant Rose’. We see a humongous, inflatable pink elephant following a young woman on her heels. Not sure if it’s just a dream or a surreal scene, we get confused by the pink animal that won’t really fit into the surrounding. The woman doesn’t even seem to apperceive the elephant which might be the embodiment of a constant thought that’s haunting her.

We just recently introduced French photographer Jean-Baptiste Courtier with his series ‘Natation Synchronisée’and are curious for more to come.

Hairy Fashion by Gerwyn Davis

This short series of Hair works by Gerwyn Davis is a series of self-portraits with the body obscured by a variety of both real and artificial hair sourced in Schöneberg.

It was created in his bedroom in Berlin last summer as an extension of his costume making work using abstract materials. Having previously worked primarily with recycled, industrial and waste materials, Gerwyn Davis was interested in experimenting with softer and more organic products to create a delicate approach to costuming.

Squish

The Squish Studio by Saunders Architcture is located just outside the small town of Tilting on the eastern end of Fogo Island, Canada. Its white angular form, sited on a rocky strip of coastline offers sharp contrast to the traditional vernacular architecture of the nearby picturesque community of Tilting. As its architect, Todd Saunders, comments: ‘…it is out of sight, but close’.

The approach to the front entry of the studio is dramatic, as the most southern end of the studio rises twenty feet above the ground. The compact, trapezium-shaped plan of the studio is augmented by the extension of the east and west exterior walls to create a sheltered, triangulated south entry deck and a north terrace that overlooks the ocean. From a distant view, the streamlined form becomes apparent with its high back and low (squished) front designed, in part, to deflect the winds from the stormy North Atlantic. It is equipped with a compost toilet, a small kitchenette and wood-burning stove. Power is supplied by stand-alone solar panels, mounted on an adjacent hilltop. Now it’s used as an artistic residence and when it is stormy you can feel the immediacy of the sea and, on some days, observe the dramatic shift of the island’s weather.

The Kicking Horse Residence

The Kicking Horse Residence by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson is arranged as two elements: a dense bar along the northern edge containing the sleeping and bath spaces, and an open shell with living and dining spaces oriented toward the extraordinary mountain views.

A glass volume links these forms, with the main entrance at the lower level and an upper landing for ski access on the west side. Careful positioning of program enables a sense of openness and transparency while screening the neighboring homes from view. The linear form of the sleeping spaces cantilevers over a board-formed concrete base containing the garage, mudroom, and playroom.

vicemag:

Tonight on VICE on HBO: Scrapping with David Choe

As you know from reading this fine piece of journalism, once-great American manufacturing cities like Detroit and Cleveland are experiencing a cultural phenomenon: scrapping. People are literally ripping apart old schools, houses, hospitals, and factories and carting away their raw materials. In tonight’s episode of VICE on HBO, artist and world traveler (and expert butt painter) David Choe investigates the life cycle of scrap metal, from the people who risk their lives to find it to the yards that buy it, all the way to the Chinese traders who take it back home to build their economy. 

Then it’s off to the Middle East, where VICE co-founder Suroosh Alvi reports on the effects of drone strikes in Pakistan. Extremism and militancy in the country have been growing in the wake of Obama’s drone campaign, and it’s not hard to see why. While the Obama administration touts drones as a surgical weapon that keeps American soldiers out of harm’s way, for the innocent victims, a.k.a. the “collateral damage,” drone strikes are hardly precise.

You should watch the teaser for the episode, above, and then check out the show tonight at 11 PM. And if you’ve never seen our HBO show… Jesus, people, you don’t have an excuse anymore: You can watch the entire first season right here for free. So get to it.

WILL IT BEARD

We’ve seen men doing fun stuff with their beard such as the Ballpoint Barber Peter Simon, though Pierce Thiot brings it to the next level with his project ‘Will It Beard’. Together with his wife Stacy he created a bizarre Tumblr that’s devoted to them sticking various household objects into Pierce’s thick facial hair. The result made our day, can’t stop looking at those hilarious pics. You can also follow the project on their Instagram.

In her photography, Lina Scheynius is capturing daily scenes and intimate moments with her friends and lovers, portraying her life with a casualness and honesty that is both touching and beautiful. View high resolution

In her photographyLina Scheynius is capturing daily scenes and intimate moments with her friends and lovers, portraying her life with a casualness and honesty that is both touching and beautiful.

timelightbox:

Photograph by William Daniels—Panos for TIME
Two months after hundreds of people were killed during street fighting between mainly Muslim rebels and Christian vigilantes in Central African Republic, photojournalist William Daniels bears witness to a violent shift in the ground dynamic gripping the fragile nation.
See more on LightBox.
View high resolution

timelightbox:

Photograph by William Daniels—Panos for TIME

Two months after hundreds of people were killed during street fighting between mainly Muslim rebels and Christian vigilantes in Central African Republic, photojournalist William Daniels bears witness to a violent shift in the ground dynamic gripping the fragile nation.

See more on LightBox.

vicemag:

Tony Matelli Doesn’t Believe His ‘Sleepwalker’ Statue Is Terrorizing Wellesley College
He stands at about 5’9” with his eyes closed, and he wears nothing besides underwear. He is known as the Sleepwalker, and he’s disturbing the student body at the all-girls Wellesley College. I’m not referring to the main character in a Neil Gaiman comic. I’m referring to artist Tony Matelli’s outdoor, bronze sculpture that’s part of the New Gravity exhibit at Wellesley’s Davis Museum.
This week, a Wellesley College junior wrote a petition for the college to remove the sculpture, because she believed it had the potential to trigger sexual assault survivors’ traumatic memories. The uproar surprised Tony, and it didn’t stop the museum from showcasing his art. Davis Museum director Lisa Fischman stood by Tony’s decision to place the sculpture where it is, saying that it provokes dialogue in a meaningful manner.
“Matelli’s Sleepwalker—considered up close—is a man in deep sleep. Arms outstretched, eyes closed, he appears vulnerable and unaware against the snowy backdrop of the space around him. He is not naked,” Lisa said in response to the petition. 
The day before the exhibit’s debut, I spoke to Tony to hear his side of the story and see how he felt about the fervor his work has created on Wellesley’s campus.
VICE: What did you think of the petition when you read it?Tony Matelli: No one made the claim that it was triggering. No first-person account came forward to say, “I am fearful of this sculpture.” It was a speculative petition signed on behalf of some speculative victim. The petition said a bunch of other things about art and where art should be. I guess people are focusing on this triggering idea, which I’m sympathetic to. I have some empathy towards that, and I can even understand that position. I can’t put myself into someone else’s head and imagine what scares them and what doesn’t.
What was your original intention for Sleepwalker?This is not the first time that I’ve made a sculpture similar to this. I’ve made a couple other sleepwalkers. One was a sculpture of a woman, and one was a sculpture of a much younger man. When I was planning for this show, I knew that I was going to do the ground floor, and I knew that I was going to do the top floor. I thought it would be cool to do something outside also. Typically when you think of outdoor sculpture, you think of big, blocky, kind-of-alien, modern artwork that feels like a real exertion of machismo—like a real exertion of corporate identity. I wanted to make something that felt really vulnerable outside and felt very lost and fragile, because outdoor sculptures never ever do that.
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vicemag:

Tony Matelli Doesn’t Believe His ‘Sleepwalker’ Statue Is Terrorizing Wellesley College

He stands at about 5’9” with his eyes closed, and he wears nothing besides underwear. He is known as the Sleepwalker, and he’s disturbing the student body at the all-girls Wellesley College. I’m not referring to the main character in a Neil Gaiman comic. I’m referring to artist Tony Matelli’s outdoor, bronze sculpture that’s part of the New Gravity exhibit at Wellesley’s Davis Museum.

This week, a Wellesley College junior wrote a petition for the college to remove the sculpture, because she believed it had the potential to trigger sexual assault survivors’ traumatic memories. The uproar surprised Tony, and it didn’t stop the museum from showcasing his art. Davis Museum director Lisa Fischman stood by Tony’s decision to place the sculpture where it is, saying that it provokes dialogue in a meaningful manner.

“Matelli’s Sleepwalker—considered up close—is a man in deep sleep. Arms outstretched, eyes closed, he appears vulnerable and unaware against the snowy backdrop of the space around him. He is not naked,” Lisa said in response to the petition. 

The day before the exhibit’s debut, I spoke to Tony to hear his side of the story and see how he felt about the fervor his work has created on Wellesley’s campus.

VICE: What did you think of the petition when you read it?
Tony Matelli: No one made the claim that it was triggering. No first-person account came forward to say, “I am fearful of this sculpture.” It was a speculative petition signed on behalf of some speculative victim. The petition said a bunch of other things about art and where art should be. I guess people are focusing on this triggering idea, which I’m sympathetic to. I have some empathy towards that, and I can even understand that position. I can’t put myself into someone else’s head and imagine what scares them and what doesn’t.

What was your original intention for Sleepwalker?
This is not the first time that I’ve made a sculpture similar to this. I’ve made a couple other sleepwalkers. One was a sculpture of a woman, and one was a sculpture of a much younger man. When I was planning for this show, I knew that I was going to do the ground floor, and I knew that I was going to do the top floor. I thought it would be cool to do something outside also. Typically when you think of outdoor sculpture, you think of big, blocky, kind-of-alien, modern artwork that feels like a real exertion of machismo—like a real exertion of corporate identity. I wanted to make something that felt really vulnerable outside and felt very lost and fragile, because outdoor sculptures never ever do that.

Continue

Fold by Nendo

The joints appear seamless due to the superior craftsmanship of Conde House, a timber furniture manufacturer in Asahikawa.

smallspacesblog:

The French Kitchen, Auckland
Photo by Daryl Ward
View high resolution

smallspacesblog:

The French Kitchen, Auckland

Photo by Daryl Ward

(via onlyfurnitures)